AI Grammars

about

Gothic

is the oldest Germanic language attested in a sizable text corpus. At the same time, it is the only East Germanic language of which more than a few words, all of them proper names, survived. The main text is a Bible translation, but with the Skeireins also an original Gothic text (albeit heavily influenced by Byzantine Greek) came upon us (see introduction). The language is transmitted in a dedicated, though defective, alphabet. The language probably had a stress accent (see sounds). Like modern Germanic languages, Gothic distinguishes two sets of adjectives, indefinite and definite. It has weak and strong verbs, the latter with complex ablaut patterns (see words). Deviations from the Greek original seem to indicate that the language was OV (see structures).

Lecturers

Ryan Sandell

LMU Munich

Nelson Goering

University of Oxford

introduction

Gothic, intro, unit 1

GOT-INT-001

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49502

linguistic affiliations and external history: history and relationships of the Goths

slides

Gothic, intro, unit 2

GOT-INT-002

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49512

writing system: the Gothic alphabet, origins, other orthographic practices, text sample

slides

Gothic, intro, unit 3

GOT-INT-003

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49499

sources and scholarly resources: manuscripts, editions, grammars, dictionaries, bibliographies

slides

sounds

Gothic, sounds, unit 1

GOT-PHO-001

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49511

orthographic interpretation and phonemic system: spelling-sound correspondences, segmental inventory, phonemic analysis

slides

Gothic, sounds, unit 2

GOT-PHO-002

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49498

syllabification and prosodic phonology: evidence for syllable structure, syllabification rules, stress, foot, clitics and prosodic words

slides

Gothic, sounds, unit 3

GOT-PHO-003

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49510

morphophonology: s-deletion, fricative substitution, i-epenthesis, a-epenthesis, Thurneysen's law, reduplication

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words

Gothic, words, unit 1

GOT-MOR-001

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49509

noun stem formation and composition: nominal system, stem formation, major noun classes, nominal composition

slides

Gothic, words, unit 2

GOT-MOR-002

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49508

adjectives, demonstratives and pronouns: inflection, gradation of adjectives, classes of pronouns, participles

slides

Gothic, words, unit 3

GOT-MOR-003

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49507

verbal stem formation: relevant morphosyntactic features, structure of the stem, strong versus weak verbs, overview of verb classes

slides

Gothic, words, unit 4

GOT-MOR-004

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49506

verbal inflection: preterite presents, copula ‘be’, inflectional endings, summary of verbal inflection, verbal prefixes

slides

structures

Gothic, structures, unit 1

GOT-STR-001

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49505

overview: translation effects, linearization, gender and agreement, number, case, possession, definiteness

slides

Gothic, structures, unit 2

GOT-STR-002

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49500

arguments and valency: alignment and subjects, causatives and transitivity, voice, adposition incorporation

slides

Gothic, structures, unit 3

GOT-STR-003

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49501

verbal syntax: past/non-past, participles, statives, aspect and prefixes, modality (optative, modal elements), negation

slides

Gothic, structures, unit 4

GOT-STR-004

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49504

clausal syntax: coordination, absolutes (dative, nominative, accusative), relative clauses, infinitives (control, accusative plus infinitive, etc.)

slides

texts

Gothic, texts, unit 1

GOT-TXT-001

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5446/49503

Text sample:
John 18:10-11

slides